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Market Drayton Infant & Nursery School

‘An excellent, happy school, where we enjoy learning’

Music

Intent

Our Music Curriculum design is based on Chris Quigley Essentials Curriculum linked to the Model Music Curriculum. Our curriculum design is based on evidence from cognitive science; three main principles underpin it:

 

  1. Learning is most effective with spaced repetition.
  2. Interleaving helps pupils to discriminate between topics and aids long-term retention.
  3. Retrieval of previously learned content is frequent and regular, which increases both storage and retrieval strength.

 

In addition to the three principles we also understand that learning is invisible in the short term and that sustained mastery takes time.

Our Values in Music

Collaboration

Respect

  • Singing- We learn to sing together as a whole-school community, a year group or class. This activity connects us.
  • Performing- we enjoy performing together, on instruments or singing.
  • Exploring- listening to different genres of music sparks lots of collaborative discussions.
  • Exploring- We work together to explore and create using our voices, bodies, tuned and un-tuned instruments.
  • Composing- we work together to create musical sound effects, explore rhythms and improvise musical phrases.

 

  • The world around us- By discovering music traditions from around the world we develop respect for different cultures and communities.
  • Respect for others- When collaborating with or listening to the work of others, we learn the importance of respecting the work, efforts, talents and opinions of our peers and other musicians.
  • Respect for equipment- regularly using instruments teaches us the importance of looking after and respecting them. We learn how to handle instruments appropriately.
  • Respect for musicians- by listening to a range of genres and exploring ‘live’ music opportunities we develop respect for musicians who create, entertain and connect with us.

Aspirations

Positivity

  • Listening- By increasing the awareness of different musical genres and traditions, our experiences are enriched.
  • Performing- By introducing us to tuned instruments and reading of notation, a new world of musical possibilities is opened up to us.
  • Broad curriculum - in order to raise aspirations, we teach beyond the national curriculum, giving all KS1 pupils the opportunity to learn two tuned instruments. We think this is important.
  • Inclusion and equality -Music has a rare and unique ability to bring people together and allows all of us, including children with SEN, not only to participate but to shine.
  • Live performances- Watching musicians perform live inspires us and shows us that we could work in a creative job when we are older
  • Have a go-We all enjoy having a go and regularly celebrate the achievements of others.
  • Wellbeing- Music brings us together as a community and improves our mental health.
  • Interleaving- This is where we keep returning to our ideas and build our learning.  For example, we learn about different rhythms and then return to it a few weeks later to help us improvise or perform. This means that we are able to revisit our learning, think about what we know and learn new things to add to it.
  • Fun- music lessons are hands-on, practical and fun!

 

In Music we want children to:

Implementation - How Do We Deliver the Music Curriculum?

Curriculum breadth

Music is taught as a discrete subject but also across the curriculum. Areas of learning, such as times tables in maths, vocabulary in languages and movement in dance can all incorporate different elements of music. A weekly Year group singing assembly allows the children opportunities to develop their singing skills and gain an understanding of how ensembles work. Performances, such as Christmas nativities, assemblies and end of year shows, demonstrate that music is important to the life of the school. Through our singing and listening we cover a wide range of musical genres which the children will revisit throughout their time in school.

 

 

Early Year Foundation stage 

Music in the Foundation Stage (Nursery to Reception) is an integral part of daily activities. Routines and concepts are regularly taught through song, opportunities to explore and play instruments are provided, both outside and inside in continuous provision, and specific vocabulary and musical concepts are taught throughout the year as part of topic work. We relate the musical aspects of the children’s work to the objectives set out in the Early Learning Goals (ELGs) which underpin the curriculum planning for children aged nought to five.  Music makes a significant contribution to the objective in the ELGs of developing a child’s skills and understanding of Expressive Arts and Design but has many cross curricular links, e.g. with physical development and communication.

 

Key Stage 1: Years 1 and 2

The breadth of the curriculum links in with the programmes of study from the national curriculum.  In Key Stage 1, the Model Curriculum provides a separate programme of study for Year 1 and 2, which we use to help us plan listening, singing, performing and composing opportunities.  As part of the local curriculum and to keep with the idea of ‘possibilities’ the school offers a broader music curriculum than the national curriculum.   Across the key stage, children are taught a tuned instrument by Shropshire Music Service; in Year 1 this is the ocarina and in Year 2, the ukulele. This valuable experience also teaches the children how to read simple notation, as well as the musicianship skills and techniques required to play an instrument. This increased understanding of what a musician does and the opportunities to learn a new skill all add to ‘cultural capital’.  

 

Threshold Concepts- In Key Stage One the Chris Quigley Threshold Concepts of Perform, Compose, Transcribe and Describe are taught and revisited throughout the two years.

Planned activities linked to the threshold concepts

Threshold Concept

Milestone 1

Years 1 and 2

Activities

Perform (Links to NC Perform Play tuned and untuned instruments musically.

/Singing Use their voices expressively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes.)

 

This concept involves understanding that music is created to be performed.

• Take part in singing, accurately following the melody.

• Follow instructions on how and when to sing or play an instrument.

• Make and control long and short sounds, using voice and instruments.

• Imitate changes in pitch.

Year1 – Ocarina – Shropshire music service

Year 1 – Weekly year group singing (Covid- do separately in classes)

Year 2 – Ukulele- Shropshire music service

Year 2 – Weekly year group singing (Covid- do separately in classes)

Year 2 Christmas and End of year performance

KS1 – Weekly singing in Assembly

KS1- Harvest Christmas Easter

 

Compose (Links to NC Listening (Listen with concentration and understanding to a range of high-quality live and recorded music.) /Compose Make and combine sounds using the inter-related dimensions of music.)

 

This concept involves appreciating that music is created through a process which has a number of techniques.

• Create a sequence of long and short sounds.

• Clap rhythms.

• Create a mixture of different sounds (long and short, loud and quiet, high and low).

• Choose sounds to create an effect.

• Sequence sounds to create an overall effect.

• Create short, musical patterns.

• Create short, rhythmic phrases.

Year 1 – Ocarina – Shropshire music service

Year 1- Opportunities in Continuous Provision

Year 1- In-class music lessons (see Cycle Planning)

Year 2 – Ukulele- Shropshire music service

Year 2- In-class music lessons (see Cycle Planning- links with computing)

 

Transcribe (Links to NC Compose Make and combine sounds using the inter-related dimensions of music.)

This concept involves understanding that compositions need to be understood by others and that there are techniques and a language for communicating them.

• Use symbols to represent a composition and use them to help with a performance.

Year 1 – Planned in-class music sessions linked to knowledge from SMS lessons.

Year 1- opportunities in Continuous provision

Year 2 – Planned in-class music sessions linked to knowledge from SMS lessons.

Describe music (Links to NC listening Listen with concentration and understanding to a range of high-quality live and recorded music.)

This concept involves appreciating the features and effectiveness of musical elements.

• Identify the beat of a tune.

• Recognise changes in timbre, dynamics and pitch.

Year 1 – Planned listening opportunities to increase awareness of musical genres

Year 1- ocarina

Year 2 – Planned listening opportunities to increase awareness of musical genres

 

Whole school – Opportunities to experience ‘live’ music performances, e.g. Key strings, Shropshire Music Service ‘live’ events, Shropshire Sings.

 

 

 

Vocabulary Progression in Music

Nursery 1

Nursery 2

Reception

Year 1

Year 2

Introduce

Bang

Clap

Loud

Quiet

Shake

Song

Sounds

Stamp

Tap

 

Bells

Drum

Tambourine

Triangle

 

Revisit

Bang

Chant

Clap

Loud

Quiet

Shake

Song

Sounds

Stamp

Tap

 

Bells

Drum

Tambourine

Triangle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduce

Beat

Fast

Humming

Rhyme

Singing

Slow

Start

Stop

Whispering

 

Claves

Indian bells

Shakers

 

 

Revisit

Bang       Beat

Chant     Clap

Fast         Humming

Loud        Quiet

Rhyme    Shake

Singing    Slow

Song        Sounds

Stamp     Start

Stop        Tap

Whispering

 

Bells

Claves

Drum

Indian bells

Shakers

Tambourine

Triangle

 

 

Introduce

High

Low

Rhythm

 

 

Chime bars    Classical

Composer      Cymbal

Folk                 Guitar

Jazz                 Maracas

Percussion     Piano

Pop                 Pulse

Recorder        Rock

Rock and roll

Singing           Speaking

Tambour       Thinking

Violin

 

Revisit

Bang    Beat

Chant   Clap

Fast      High

Humming

Loud     Low

Quiet   Rhyme

Rhythm

Shake

Singing

Slow     Song

Sounds

Stamp  Start

Stop     Tap

Whispering

 

Bells

Chime bars

Classical

Claves

composer

Cymbal   Drum

Folk        Guitar

Indian bells

Jazz      Maracas

Percussion

Piano      Pop

Pulse  Recorder

Rock

Rock and roll

Shakers

Singing

Speaking

Tambour

Tambourine

Thinking

Triangle

Violin

Introduce

echo

mood

muffle

Pitch dynamics

posture

respond

technique

tempo

tone

tonguing

vibration

volume

 

crotchet

minim

ocarina

quaver

rest

Revisit and use confidently

Bang     Beat

Chant   Clap

crotchet

Dynamics

echo     Fast

High     Humming

Loud     Low

Minim   mood

muffle   Pitch

posture  quaver

Quiet     respond

Rest       rhyme

Rhythm

Shake    Singing

Slow      Song

Sounds  Stamp

Start      Stop

Tap        technique

Tempo   tone

vibration

volume

Whispering

 

Bells      Chime bars

Classical

Claves   Composer

Cymbal  Drum

Folk       Guitar

Indian bells

Jazz      Maracas

Percussion

Piano   Pop

Pulse    Recorder

Rock    

Rock and roll

Shakers   Singing

Speaking Tambour

Tambourine

Thinking  Triangle

Violin

Special Educational Needs and Music

Music has a rare and unique ability to bring people together; music making can make a whole class, school and community feel connected to others and part of something bigger. Our music curriculum celebrates the inclusion of all pupils including those with special educational needs and disabilities, ensuring that all children can reach their creative potential. The National Curriculum Inclusion Statement states that teachers should set high expectations for every pupil, whatever their prior attainment. Teachers should use appropriate assessment to set targets which are deliberately ambitious. Potential areas of difficulty should be identified and addressed at the outset. Lessons should be planned to address potential areas of difficulty and to remove barriers to pupil achievement.

Links to other subjects

Year

Subject

How music may be linked

EYFS

Birth to three year olds

Expressive Arts and Design

Show attention to sounds and music. Respond emotionally and physically to music when it changes.

Move and dance to music.

Anticipate phrases and actions in rhymes and songs, like ‘Peepo’.

Explore their voices and enjoy making sounds.

Join in with songs and rhymes, making some sounds.

Make rhythmical and repetitive sounds.  Explore a range of sound makers and instruments and play them in different ways

Enjoy and take part in action songs, such as ‘Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star’.

Communication and Language

Enjoy singing, music and toys that make sounds

Physical development

Clap and stamp to music

Literacy

Enjoy songs and rhymes, tuning in and paying attention.

Join in with songs and rhymes, copying sounds, rhythms, tunes and tempo.

Say some of the words in songs and rhymes. Copy finger movements and other gestures. Sing songs and say rhymes independently, for example, singing whilst playing.

EYFS

Three and four year olds

 

Communication and Language

 

Sing a large repertoire of songs.

 

Physical development

 

Use large-muscle movements to wave flags and streamers, paint and make marks.

Expressive Arts and Design

 

Listen with increased attention to sounds.

Respond to what they have heard, expressing their thoughts and feelings.

Remember and sing entire songs.

Sing the pitch of a tone sung by another person (‘pitch match’).

Sing the melodic shape (moving melody, such as up and down, down and up) of familiar songs.

Create their own songs, or improvise a song around one they know.

Play instruments with increasing control to express their feelings and ideas.

EYFS

Reception

Communication and Language

 Listen carefully to rhymes and songs, paying attention to how they sound.

Learn rhymes, poems and songs.

 

Physical development

 

Combine different movements with ease and fluency

Expressive Arts and Design

Explore, use and refine a variety of artistic effects to express their ideas and feelings.

Return to and build on their previous learning, refining ideas and developing their ability to represent them.

Create collaboratively, sharing ideas, resources and skills.

Listen attentively, move to and talk about music, expressing their feelings and responses.

Sing in a group or on their own, increasingly matching the pitch and following the melody.

Explore and engage in music making and dance, performing solo or in groups.

KS1

English

Stories- Stories are often used as stimuli for music activities. Instruments may be selected to represent a particular character or scene.

Vocabulary- There is a progression of musical vocabulary that is taught to the children to help them develop Tier Three vocabulary, e.g. rhythm, beat and pulse may be used when discussing the elements of a musical piece.

Communication- Children learn to communicate their musical knowledge through talking with a partner, in groups and in whole class discussions.

Maths

Singing songs is a great way to learn counting patterns and number facts, e.g. times tables or doubles.

Geography

By studying music from different cultures and countries, the children develop their knowledge and understanding of traditions and place. Songs are also a useful vehicle for remembering facts such as the continents, oceans and countries of the UK.

History

Although we do not learn about specific composers in History, the children are exposed to a range of musical genres and learn to link these to different time periods.

PE- Dance

In dance, children learn to use their bodies to respond to stimuli, often a piece of music. By developing fluency of movement and listening to musical elements such as beat tempo or dynamics, they learn to express feelings use their bodies to communicate.

Impact - How Do We Help Children Get to a Deep Level of Understanding?

To help children get to a deep level of understanding about music we introduce them to a range of musical genres throughout their school careers from Nursery 1 to Year 2. Through discussion, practical hands-on exploration and taught sessions, the children are gradually introduced to the elements of music.

 

Through both the EYFS curriculum and the Threshold Concepts, the children review and build upon knowledge each time they revisit a concept. Through our partnership with the Shropshire Music Service, pupils in Key Stage One are taught by a specialist teacher allowing high quality music tuition to take place and misconceptions to be dealt with. At times during the year, quizzes are used to review and encourage discussion. The frequent listening opportunities allow children to compare and contrast genres as their growing musical vocabularies develop. The experience of learning a tuned instrument is invaluable in the pursuance of deep understanding. Children develop learning skills such as perseverance and resilience whilst mastering the basic techniques.

 

As most of our work in music is practical, we use floor books and videos to record.

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